Technical Problems

Industrial Wind Power does not reduce dependence on foreign oil

  • Industrial wind produces only electricity.
  • Roughly 1% of American electricity is generated through oil, less than 2.5% through petroleum-based sources.
  • Even if 100% of our electricity could be generated by wind, it would have no material impact on foreign oil dependence.

Industrial wind can never replace traditional methods of power generation

The wind is completely unreliable, so the power infrastructure must be built as if industrial wind doesn’t exist. At best, wind can only supply additional electricity. Wind cannot replace conventional power generation.

  • All conventional generators are highly reliability. Wind provides zero reliability. Reliability is known as “capacity value” in the power industry.
  • Wind can only provide electricity to a grid, not capacity or modern power performance.
  • Because wind is constantly unreliable, the power infrastructure must be built as if industrial wind doesn’t exist.
  • At best wind can only supply additional electricity. Wind cannot replace conventional generators.

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Biomass

Biomass is plant matter such as trees, grasses, agricultural crops or other biological material. It can be used as a solid fuel, or converted into liquid or gaseous forms, for the production of electric power, heat, chemicals, or fuels.

Sources of Biomass

Wood
The most common form of biomass is wood. Wood was the main source of energy in the U.S. and the rest of the world until the mid-1800s. Biomass continues to be a major source of energy in much of the developing world. In the United States wood and waste (bark, sawdust, wood chips, and wood scrap) provide only about 2 percent of the energy we use today.

Burning Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)
Burning municipal solid waste (MSW or garbage) and wood waste to produce energy, means that less of it has to get buried in landfills. Plants that burn waste to make electricity must use technology to prevent harmful gases and particles from coming out of their smoke stacks. The particles that are filtered out are added to the ash that is removed from the bottom of the furnace. Because the ash may contain harmful chemicals and metals, it must be disposed of carefully. Sometimes the ash can be used for road work or building purposes.

Collecting landfill gas or biogas
Collecting and using landfill and biogas reduces the amount of methane that is released into the air. Methane is one of the greenhouse gases associated with global climate change. Many landfills find it cheaper to just burn-off the gas that they collect because the gas needs to be processed before it can be put into natural gas pipelines.

Ethanol
Since the early 1990s ethanol has been blended into gasoline to reduce harmful carbon monoxide emissions. Blending ethanol into gasoline also reduces toxic pollutants found in gasoline but causes more “evaporative emissions” to escape. In order to reduce evaporative emissions, the gasoline requires extra processing before it can be blended with ethanol. When burned, ethanol does release carbon dioxide, a green house gas. But growing plants for ethanol may reduce greenhouse gases, since plants use carbon dioxide and produce oxygen as they grow.

Biodiesel
Biodiesel is much less polluting than petroleum diesel. It results in much lower emissions of almost every pollutant: sulfur oxide, particulates, carbon monoxide, air toxics and unburned hydrocarbons. Biodiesel does have nitrogen oxide emissions that are about 10 percent higher though. Blending biodiesel into petroleum diesel can help reduce emissions. Biodiesel contains almost no sulfur and can help reduce sulfur in diesel fuel used throughout the country.

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Efficient Heating Systems

Upgrading a furnace or boiler from 56% to 90% efficiency in an average cold-climate house will save 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year with gas fuel, or 2.5 tons with with oil fuel.

Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most households. A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling your home, and they achieve a wide range of efficiencies. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have common supporting equipment, such as thermostats and ducts, which provide opportunities for more energy savings.

Understanding the Efficiency Rating of Furnaces and Boilers

Furnace and boiler efficiency is measured by annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE). The Federal Trade Commission requires new furnaces or boilers to display their AFUE so consumers can compare heating efficiencies of various models.

AFUE is the ratio of heat output of the furnace or boiler compared to the total energy consumed by a furnace or boiler. An AFUE of 90% means that 90% of the energy in the fuel becomes heat for the home and the other 10% escapes up the chimney and elsewhere. AFUE doesn’t include the heat losses of the duct system or piping, which can be as much as 35%.

You can identify and compare a system’s efficiency by not only its AFUE but also by its equipment features, listed below.

Old, low-efficiency heating systems:

  • Natural draft that creates a flow of combustion gases
  • Continuous pilot light
  • Heavy heat exchanger
  • 68%–72% AFUE

Mid-efficiency heating systems:

  • Exhaust fan controls the flow of combustion air and combustion gases more precisely
  • Electronic ignition (no pilot light)
  • Compact size and lighter weight to reduce cycling losses
  • Small-diameter flue pipe
  • 80%–83% AFUE

High-efficiency heating systems:

  • Condensing flue gases in a second heat exchanger for extra efficiency
  • Sealed combustion
  • 90%–97% AFUE

Retrofitting Your Furnace or Boiler

Furnaces and boilers can be retrofitted to increase their efficiency. These upgrades improve the safety and efficiency of otherwise sound, older systems. The costs of retrofits should be carefully weighed against the cost of a new boiler or furnace, especially if replacement is likely within a few years. If you choose to replace your gas heating system, you’ll have the opportunity to install equipment that incorporates the most energy-efficient heating technologies available.

Retrofitting options that can improve a system’s energy efficiency include installing programmable thermostats, upgrading ductwork in forced-air systems, and adding zone control for hot-water systems.

Replacing Your Furnace or Boiler

Energy efficiency upgrades and new high-efficiency heating system can cut fuel bills and pollution output in half. Modern conventional heating systems can achieve efficiencies as high as 97%, converting nearly all the fuel to useful heat for your home while older furnace and boiler systems have efficiencies in the range of 56%–70%. Upgrading a furnace or boiler from 56% to 90% efficiency in an average cold-climate house will save 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year with gas fuel, or 2.5 tons with with oil fuel.

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Efficient Heating Systems

Upgrading a furnace or boiler from 56% to 90% efficiency in an average cold-climate house will save 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year with gas fuel, or 2.5 tons with with oil fuel.

Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most households. A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling your home, and they achieve a wide range of efficiencies. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have common supporting equipment, such as thermostats and ducts, which provide opportunities for more energy savings.

Understanding the Efficiency Rating of Furnaces and Boilers

Furnace and boiler efficiency is measured by annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE). The Federal Trade Commission requires new furnaces or boilers to display their AFUE so consumers can compare heating efficiencies of various models.

AFUE is the ratio of heat output of the furnace or boiler compared to the total energy consumed by a furnace or boiler. An AFUE of 90% means that 90% of the energy in the fuel becomes heat for the home and the other 10% escapes up the chimney and elsewhere. AFUE doesn’t include the heat losses of the duct system or piping, which can be as much as 35%.

You can identify and compare a system’s efficiency by not only its AFUE but also by its equipment features, listed below.

Old, low-efficiency heating systems:

  • Natural draft that creates a flow of combustion gases
  • Continuous pilot light
  • Heavy heat exchanger
  • 68%–72% AFUE

Mid-efficiency heating systems:

  • Exhaust fan controls the flow of combustion air and combustion gases more precisely
  • Electronic ignition (no pilot light)
  • Compact size and lighter weight to reduce cycling losses
  • Small-diameter flue pipe
  • 80%–83% AFUE

High-efficiency heating systems:

  • Condensing flue gases in a second heat exchanger for extra efficiency
  • Sealed combustion
  • 90%–97% AFUE

Retrofitting Your Furnace or Boiler

Furnaces and boilers can be retrofitted to increase their efficiency. These upgrades improve the safety and efficiency of otherwise sound, older systems. The costs of retrofits should be carefully weighed against the cost of a new boiler or furnace, especially if replacement is likely within a few years. If you choose to replace your gas heating system, you’ll have the opportunity to install equipment that incorporates the most energy-efficient heating technologies available.

Retrofitting options that can improve a system’s energy efficiency include installing programmable thermostats, upgrading ductwork in forced-air systems, and adding zone control for hot-water systems.

Replacing Your Furnace or Boiler

Energy efficiency upgrades and new high-efficiency heating system can cut fuel bills and pollution output in half. Modern conventional heating systems can achieve efficiencies as high as 97%, converting nearly all the fuel to useful heat for your home while older furnace and boiler systems have efficiencies in the range of 56%–70%. Upgrading a furnace or boiler from 56% to 90% efficiency in an average cold-climate house will save 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year with gas fuel, or 2.5 tons with with oil fuel.

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Wind Power Problems

Wind Power is Technically, Economically
and Environmentally Flawed.

Human Health Problems

Wind Turbine Syndrome is the clinical name Dr. Nina Pierpont has given to the constellation of symptoms experienced by many (not all) people who find themselves living near industrial wind turbines.

  1. Sleep disturbance
  2. Headache
  3. Tinnitus (pronounced “tin-uh-tus”: ringing or buzzing in the ears)
  4. Ear pressure
  5. Dizziness (a general term that includes vertigo, lightheadedness, sensation of almost fainting, etc.)
  6. Vertigo (clinically, vertigo refers to the sensation of spinning, or the room moving)
  7. Nausea
  8. Visual blurring
  9. Tachycardia (rapid heart rate)
  10. Irritability
  11. Problems with concentration and memory
  12. Panic episodes associated with sensations of internal pulsation or quivering, which arise while awake or asleep

 

Environmental Problems

Windplants destroy ecosystems and kill wildlife.

  • Wind plant construction causes serious erosion in fragile ecosystems
  • 4 acres of forest is clearcut for each turbine
  • Turbines are proven to kill birds and bats
  • Turbines are proven to disrupt wild animals and natural habitats

 

Industrial wind has no material impact on global warming or carbon emissions.

  • Zero traditional power plants can be decommissioned or replaced by windplants.
  • Wind electricity production rate is in constant flux and the power grid already has significant demand flux.
  • The grid must maintain balance between constantly demand flux and constant wind flux, exacerbated by occasional extremely wide swings in wind energy production rate.
  • The grid compensates for wind flux with conventional generation, typically fossil-fired plants, working inefficiently in overtime and producing substantial carbon emissions in the process.
  • Backing up windplants creates more carbon emission than producing the same electricity through traditional methods alone.
  • There are 100k turbines in operation in the world. If they reduce c02 – why hasn’t the wind industry provided proof ?

 

Economic Problems

Industrial Wind is the least cost-effective source of power

  • Total costs
  • Taxpayer costs
  • Ratepayer costs

Windplants do not provide the “green jobs” they promise

  • A couple of maintenance and security workers are all that’s needed by functioning windplants.
  • The real “green jobs” are created in China where turbines are manufactured.

 

Technical Problems

Industrial wind does not reduce dependence on foreign oil.

  • Industrial wind produces only electricity.
  • Roughly 1% of American electricity is generated through oil, less than 2.5% through petroleum-based sources.
  • Even if 100% of our electricity could be generated by wind, it would have no material impact on foreign oil dependence.

Industrial wind is so unreliable it can never replace traditional methods of power generation.

  • All conventional generators are highly reliability. Wind provides zero reliability. Reliability is known as “capacity value” in the power industry.
  • Wind can only provide electricity to a grid, not capacity or modern power performance.
  • Because wind is constantly unreliable, the power infrastructure must be built as if industrial wind doesn’t exist.
  • At best wind can only supply additional electricity. Wind cannot replace conventional generators.

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Efficient Cooling Systems

A combination of proper insulation, energy-efficient windows and doors, daylighting, shading, and ventilation will usually keep homes cool with a low amount of energy use in all but the hottest climates.

Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Ventilated attics are about 30°F (16°C) cooler than unventilated attics. Properly sized and placed louvers and roof vents help prevent moisture buildup and overheating in attics.

Avoiding Heat Buildup
Keeping the heat outside, avoiding heat-generating activities, and using spot ventilation can help keep buildings cool during hot days.

Natural Ventilation
In some parts of the United States, natural convection and cool breezes are sufficient to keep homes cool.

Ceiling Fans and Other Circulating Fans
Fans that circulate air within your home can improve your comfort level.

Window Fans
Window fans use relatively little electricity and provide sufficient cooling for homes in many parts of the country.

Whole House Fans
For larger homes, a whole house fan provides excellent ventilation to achieve lower indoor temperatures. For homes with ducts, an alternative approach uses those ducts to supply ventilation air throughout the home.

Air Conditioning
Two-thirds of all homes in the United States have air conditioners. Air conditioners use about 5% of all the electricity produced in the United States, at a cost of over $11 billion to homeowners. Switching to high-efficiency air conditioners and taking other actions to keep your home cool could reduce this energy use by 20%–50%.

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Environmental Problems

Wind turbines destroy ecosystems, kill birds and bats, and disturb wild animals.

Photos of environmental destruction from turbine construction.

Local Environmental Impacts

  • Wind plant infrastructure creates an industrial nightmare in wild and natural settings:
    • Construction of 70ft wide access roads
    • Installation of new transmission lines
    • Construction of power substations
    • Excavations and concrete for turbine foundations
  • 4-6 acres of forest is clearcut for each turbine.
    • Construction of a 25-turbine wind facility clears enough trees to fill 100 football fields

Bird and Bat Deaths

Two griffon vultures killed by turbines in Navarre, Spain. One of them has been sliced in half by the blade. Source.
  • Turbines are proven to kill birds and bats.
  • Turbines are proven to disrupt wild animals and natural habitats.

“This is a double standard that more people—and not just bird lovers—should be paying attention to. In protecting America’s wildlife, federal law-enforcement officials are turning a blind eye to the harm done by “green” energy.”
Windmills Are Killing Our Birds
Robert Bryce WSJ.com

“Once thought to have practically no adverse environmental effects, it is now recognized that wind power facilities can have adverse impacts—particularly on wildlife, and most significantly on birds and bats. ”
Impacts on Wildlife and Government Responsibilities for Regulating Development and Protecting Wildlife
United States Government Accountability Office, September 2005

“At wind power-generating facilities in Appalachia and California, wind turbines have killed large numbers of migratory birds and bats. Wind power facilities may also have other impacts on wildlife through alterations of habitat. Habitat destruction and modification is a leading threat to the continued survival of wildlife species in the United States. ”
Impacts on Wildlife and Government Responsibilities for Regulating Development and Protecting Wildlife
United States Government Accountability Office, September 2005

Industrial wind has no material impact on global warming or carbon emissions.

  • Traditional power plants cannot be decommissioned or replaced by wind turbines.
  • Wind electricity production rate is in constant flux and the power grid already has significant demand flux.
  • The grid must maintain balance between constantly demand flux and constant wind flux.
  • The grid compensates for wind flux with conventional generation, typically fossil-fired plants, working inefficiently in overtime and producing substantial carbon emissions in the process.
  • Backing up wind turbines creates more carbon emission than producing the same electricity through traditional methods alone.

There are 100k turbines in operation in the world. If they reduce c02, why hasn’t the wind industry provided proof ?

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Air Sealing and Insulation

Air Sealing and Insulation

The most effective way to reduce a building’s heating and cooling costs is through proper insulation and air sealing techniques. In addition to making buildings more energy efficient, these techniques also make them more comfortable. Proper moisture control and ventilation strategies will improve the effectiveness of air sealing and insulation, and vice versa.

Thorough energy efficiency is achieved by combined all four elements:

  • Air sealing
  • Insulation
  • Moisture control
  • Ventilation

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Energy Efficient Doors and Windows

New and replacement doors and windows
Energy efficient doors and windows are an essential component of thorough insulation and air sealing. Replacing old doors and windows of existing buildings is the most complete method of lower heating and cooling costs and more efficient energy use.

If you’re building a new home, you should consider buying the most energy-efficient doors and windows possible. When selecting doors for energy efficiency, it’s important to first consider their energy performance ratings in relation to your climate and home’s design. This will help narrow your selection.

Storm doors and windows

Storm windows are an economical way to increase the efficiency of older, single-pane windows. They reduce the flow of outside air into your home. The airspace between the storm window and your existing window works as added insulation. Adding a storm door can be a good investment if your existing door is old but still in good condition. However, adding a storm door to a newer, insulated door is not generally worth the expense since you won’t save much more energy.

Weathersealing older doors and windows

Small cracks and crevices around doors and windows may not seem like a problem, but did you know that a 1/8″ space between a standard exterior door and its threshold is equivalent to a two square inch hole in the wall? Closing those gaps can save you up to 15 percent in heating and cooling costs and also can reduce the demand on your heating and cooling system.

Energy efficiency for doors and windows is achieved by:

  • Weatherstripping around standard doors and windows
  • Storm doors and storm windows
  • Replacing old doors and windows with new energy efficient models
  • New construction using energy modern designs

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Energy Conservation is a More Effective Solution.

Energy Conservation is the Best Option for Solving Our Environmental and Energy Challenges.

Reducing the amount of electricity and oil consumed is the most effective and affordable way to reduce carbon emissions, pollution, and dependence on foreign oil. Industrial Wind Power only adds energy to the system, it does not replace the fossil fuel burned to create baseload electricity. Programs and incentives to reduce the amount of electricity and fossil fuel used, however, do reduce carbon emissions, pollution and dependence on foreign oil. Conservation works and every taxpayer dollar spent on subsidizing industrial wind power, instead of energy conservation programs, is a dollar wasted.

Energy Conservation Techniques

  • Insulation and Air Sealing
  • Energy Efficient Doors, Windows and Skylights
  • Efficient building heating and cooling systems
  • Biomass

Insulation and Air Sealing

The most effective way to reduce a building’s heating and cooling costs and energy use is through proper insulation and air sealing techniques. In addition to making buildings more energy efficient, these techniques also make them more comfortable. Proper moisture control and ventilation strategies will improve the effectiveness of air sealing and insulation, and vice versa.

Thorough energy efficiency is achieved by combined all four elements:

  • Air sealing
  • Insulation
  • Moisture control
  • Ventilation

Learn more about Insulation and Air Sealing Technology.

Energy Efficient Doors & Windows

Energy efficient doors and windows are an essential component of thorough insulation and air sealing. Replacing old doors and windows of existing buildings is the most complete method of lower heating and cooling costs and more efficient energy use. Significant energy saving can also be achieved by adding storm windows and weather stripping to doors and windows in good condition.

  • Replacement doors and windows
  • Storm doors and storm windows
  • Weathersealing older doors and windows

Learn more about Energy Efficient Doors and Windows.

Efficient Heating Systems

Upgrading a furnace or boiler from 56% to 90% efficiency in an average cold-climate house will save 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year with gas fuel, or 2.5 tons with with oil fuel.

Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most households. A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling your home, and they achieve a wide range of efficiencies. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have common supporting equipment, such as thermostats and ducts, which provide opportunities for more energy savings.

  • Understanding the Efficiency Rating of Furnaces and Boilers
  • Retrofitting Furnaces and Boilers
  • Replacing Furnaces and Boilers

Learn more about Energy Efficient Heating Systems.

Efficient Cooling Systems

Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans and window fans.

  • Avoiding Heat Buildup
  • Natural Ventilation
  • Ceiling Fans and Other Circulating Fans
  • Window Fans
  • Whole House Fans
  • Air Conditioning

Learn more about Energy Efficient Cooling Systems.

Biomass

Biomass is plant matter such as trees, grasses, agricultural crops or other biological material. It can be used as a solid fuel, or converted into liquid or gaseous forms, for the production of electric power, heat, chemicals, or fuels.

Sources of Biomass:

  • Wood
  • Burning Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)
  • Collecting landfill gas or biogas
  • Ethanol
  • Biodiesel

Learn more about Biomass Energy Sources.

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